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Chuck Roast Burnt Ends (Poor Man’s Burnt Ends)

Published on 01/13/2024 by Umamiology
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The rich taste of Chuck Roast Burnt Ends, also known as a “Poor Man’s Burnt Ends,” is surprisingly good. This recipe transforms the budget-friendly chuck roast cut into a flavorful masterpiece that redefines your burnt ends barbecue experience.

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This Poor Man’s Burnt Ends recipe featuring Chuck Roast, instead of the typical brisket, is rich and flavorful.

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With the right smoking technique and the perfect blend of spices and a sweet & savory sauce – you’ll never lose a neighborhood cook-off ever again, making you the top pit master in your area code.

What are Chuck Roast Burnt Ends?

Burnt ends are square nuggets of brisket meat, slow-smoked over a grill and caramelized with a sweet barbecue glaze. They are traditionally made with the trimmings from the fat-capped point section of a whole brisket, which typically is the fattier portion of a brisket, resulting in a rich, sticky bite of flavor that coats your entire mouth (Brisket Burnt Ends). But for those that want another heartier burnt ends bite at a lower cost – chuck roast burnt ends are the perfect alternative.

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And just in case you were curious, flavor-wise, the brisket and chuck roast are equally beefy and rich, most likely because they are very close in terms of the location of the cut on the cow. So with the right cooking methods, you’ll hardly be able to tell the difference between brisket burnt ends and chuck roast burnt ends.

The Flavoring for Chuck Roast Burnt Ends

There are 2 things you need to get maximum flavor in your Poor Man’s Burnt Ends – Lillie’s Q – Carolina Barbeque Sauce and Woodinville Barrel-Aged Maple Syrup.

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Lillie’s Q Sauces & Rubs – This Chicago-based barbeque company has some of the best sauces I’ve ever tasted (and coming from someone that’s lived in Texas for 14 years, that’s no small statement). I accidentally discovered this line of sauces at a local grocery store and was not disappointed. For this particular Chuck Roast Burnt Ends recipe, we are using their sweet and tangy Carolina Barbeque Sauce.

Woodinville Whiskey Co. – This legendary distillery creates award winning craft whiskey – and it’s perhaps my favorite brand of liquor. And after they empty their bourbon barrels, they refill them with pure, dark, grade-A maple syrup – to develop an amazing quality maple syrup, with a signature hint of Woodinville Whiskey. Adding this, to our recipe, will give the burnt ends a sweet, caramel flavor.

The Ingredients for Chuck Roast Burnt Ends

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The Equipment Needed

Preparing The Chuck Roast

Take your chuck roast and rub a thin layer of yellow mustard all over. This will serve as our spice binder.

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Then, season the chuck roast with a liberal dusting of garlic powder and your Salt Lick Dry Rub. I’ve found that when I smoke any red meat, this Salt Lick dry rub is the best. It’s tangy, savory and has a rich umami flavor that exudes into the meat.

Let the chuck roast sit for 20 minutes, for all of the spices to marinate.

Smoking The Chuck Roast

First, preheat your smoker to 200°F.

For smoking wood, the best type I’ve found for this recipe is hickory wood, for that deeper smokey flavor and higher smoke output (vs fruit tree woods like apple or cherry). Mesquite, oak and maple are good alternatives as well – but, to be honest, any kind of hard smoking wood, would be just fine. (I’m using hickory wood pellets in my Traeger smoker.)

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Once your smoker has reached the 200°F temperature, place your chuck roast directly on the smoker grill and smoke until the meat reaches an internal temperature of 165°F (takes about 3-4 hours). Be sure to spritz with apple juice every hour to prevent the meat from drying out too much.

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Once the internal temperature of the chuck roast reaches 165°F, wrap the meat with butcher paper and smoke again – turning up the smoker temperature to 250°F degrees until the internal temperature of the roast reaches 190°F (should be about an additional 50-60 minutes).

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Pro tip: Be sure to spritz once with apple juice before wrapping in butcher paper.

One key thing to note is that meat should always be cooked to the right internal temperature, vs time on grill. So make adjustments to your smoking time to make sure you reach the proper internal temperature before removing from the smoker.

Putting It All Together

After the chuck roast is done smoking, pull off the grill and let rest for 10-15 minutes for the juices to redistribute into the meat.

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Afterwards, cube the chuck roast into 1 inch squares and place into a foil baking pan.

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Add in half a cup of brown sugar, 4 pads of butter (4 tablespoons), 2 tablespoons of Woodinville Barrel-Aged Maple Syrup, and 1 bottle of Lillie’s Q – Carolina Barbeque Sauce and mix until every piece of the chuck roast is fully coated.

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Following that, place the foil baking pan onto the smoker one last time. Heat until the chuck roast cubes are tender (internal temperature of the cubes should be 200°F.)

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Next, remove from smoker, plate your amazing chuck roast burnt ends and enjoy!

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Chuck Roast Burnt Ends (Poor Man’s Burnt Ends)

5 from 29 votes
The rich taste of Chuck Roast Burnt Ends, also known as a "Poor Man's Burnt Ends," is surprisingly good. This recipe transforms the budget-friendly chuck roast cut into a flavorful masterpiece that redefines your burnt ends barbecue experience.
Author: Umamiology
Servings: 8
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 hours
Total Time: 5 hours 5 minutes
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Equipment

Ingredients 

Instructions 

Preparing The Chuck Roast

  • Take your chuck roast and rub a thin layer of yellow mustard all over. This will serve as our spice binder.
  • Then, season the chuck roast with a liberal dusting of garlic powder and your Salt Lick Dry Rub. I've found that when I smoke any red meat, this Salt Lick dry rub is the best. It's tangy, savory and has a rich umami flavor that exudes into the meat.
  • Let the chuck roast sit for 20 minutes, for all of the spices to marinate.

Smoking The Chuck Roast

  • Preheat your smoker to 200°F.
  • For smoking wood, the best type I've found for this recipe is hickory wood, for that deeper smokey flavor and higher smoke output (vs fruit tree woods like apple or cherry). Mesquite, oak and maple are good alternatives as well – but, to be honest, any kind of hard smoking wood, would be just fine. (I'm using hickory wood pellets in my Traeger smoker.)
  • Once your smoker has reached the 200°F temperature, place your chuck roast directly on the smoker grill and smoke until the meat reaches an internal temperature of 165°F (takes about 3-4 hours). Be sure to spritz with apple juice every hour to prevent the meat from drying out too much.
  • Once the internal temperature of the chuck roast reaches 165°F, wrap the meat with butcher paper and smoke again – turning up the smoker temperature to 250°F degrees until the internal temperature of the roast reaches 190°F (should be about an additional 50-60 minutes).
  • Pro tip: Be sure to spritz once with apple juice before wrapping in butcher paper.
  • One key thing to note is that meat should always be cooked to the right internal temperature, vs time on grill. So make adjustments to your smoking time to make sure you reach the proper internal temperature before removing from the smoker.

Putting It All Together

  • Once the chuck roast is done smoking, pull off the grill and let rest for 10-15 minutes for the juices to redistribute into the meat.
  • Afterwards, cube the chuck roast into 1 inch squares and place into a foil baking pan.
  • Add in half a cup of brown sugar, 4 pads of butter (4 tablespoons), 2 tablespoons of Woodinville Barrel-Aged Maple Syrup, and 1 bottle of Lillie's Q – Carolina Barbeque Sauce and mix until every piece of the chuck roast is fully coated.
  • Following that, place the foil baking pan onto the smoker one last time. Heat until the chuck roast cubes are tender (internal temperature of the cubes should be 200°F.)
  • Remove from smoker, plate your amazing chuck roast burnt ends and enjoy!

Nutrition

Calories: 745kcalCarbohydrates: 44gProtein: 56gFat: 39gSaturated Fat: 18gPolyunsaturated Fat: 3gMonounsaturated Fat: 18gTrans Fat: 2gCholesterol: 211mgSodium: 905mgPotassium: 1163mgFiber: 1gSugar: 37gVitamin A: 382IUVitamin C: 2mgCalcium: 106mgIron: 7mg

*Nutritional information is just an estimate derived by an online calculation tool.

FAQ

How long does it take to smoke chuck roast for burnt ends?

The total smoke time for poor man’s burnt ends can be anywhere from 5-6 hours. It depends on the consistency of your smoker temperature and the thickness of your chuck roast.

Is it good to smoke chuck roast?

Yes, chuck roast holds up really well to smoking and the flavor of smoke adds a deep, spicy depth to the taste.

At what temperature do you smoke chuck roast?

You can smoke your chuck roast anywhere between 250-275 degrees °F.

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